February 13th, 2014 by Mike Fulton

There are Kindle apps for iOS, Android, Windows, Windows Metro and Mac, not to mention the Amazon Kindle Cloud Reader.  Oh, and really the modern Kindle devices, the color ones anyway, are using apps running on a specialized flavor of Android, so let’s count that too. From here out, if I refer to “Kindle” without mentioning a specific version, assume I mean all of the platforms collectively.

On the one hand, it’s nothing short of awesome that Amazon has supported such a wide range of platforms and made Kindle so widely available. On the other hand, it’s also true that the apps are rarely updated with new features.  To their credit, Amazon releases regular bug-fix updates but there are quite a lot of features missing from the apps that would be welcome additions.  Maybe the sheer number of platforms they support is part of the reason why new features are slow in coming.  After all, if you add a new feature to one version, you’ve got to eventually add it to the others as well.

However, the new features do trickle out eventually, so I have to presume someone at Amazon is listening to users’ requests or at least thinking along similar lines.  With that in mind, I’d like to throw out some new ideas.  Or maybe just refresh some old ones.

Support For Multiple Accounts

In a family household, it’s not unusual to have devices that are shared between multiple people.  It would be very convenient if the Kindle could keep track of multiple accounts and let users switch between them more easily.  Allow each account to control things like if purchases can be made without entering the password or not.

Better Parental Controls

Mom needs to be able to hand off her Kindle to her 12 year-old daughter so she can read Pride And Prejudice without worrying about her getting into 50 Shades of Gray instead.  Give parents the ability to mark individual books as being adults-only and require a password to be entered before the book can be opened.

Support For ePub

Kindle’s original file format is based on the Mobipocket format which had been around for several years before the Kindle’s debut.  The AZW format used by Kindle is essentially a MOBI file with digital rights management added on, and the Kindle can still read unprotected .MOBI files.  More recently, Amazon has added a new file format called KF8 (Kindle Format 8 ) which extends the AZW format to provide more formatting capabilities with HTML5 and CSS3.

There are a few other reader devices out there which can read unprotected .MOBI files, but nothing else can read AZW or KF8 files.  And if you own an eBook reader made by someone other than Amazon, chances are it uses the ePub format.  This is an open standard for eBooks created and maintained by the International Digital Publishing Forum.

Kindle does not support the ePub format. It would be nice if they did.  I’m not saying Amazon should start publishing eBooks in that format, but it would be very useful if the Kindle could at least read ePub files obtained from other sources.

For one thing, ePub files tend to be a bit smaller than the Kindle formats.  It’s not uncommon for an eBook file to take half as much space in eBook format as the Kindle’s native formats.

More importantly, though, there are a wide range of free eBooks out there on the web which are only available in ePub format.  Usually you can run them through a converter like the Calibre software, and convert them into .MOBI files that you can use with the Kindle, but this extra step puts things beyond the capabilities of a more casual, less tech-savvy user.

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